PRIVACY AND SURVEILLANCE CONCEPTS (II)

DESCRIPTION

In this module, the digital and technological elements of surveillance come to the fore. Students are introduced to concepts describing surveillance overreach and discrimination, and other concepts such as ‘dataveillance’ which describes the ways that information and communication technologies have facilitated new forms of surveillance. Identification, one of the practices ICT speeds up and widens, is treated in relation to its socio-technical ramifications. Students are also introduced to the economic elements of privacy and surveillance.

 

CONTENTS

 

– Digital identification technologies and Dataveillance

– Identification practices and techno-social relations (STS)

– The economics of privacy

– Technology and surveillance risks (function creep, disclosure, discrimination, etc.)

– The surveillance industry: actors and exports

 

ECTS: 4

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Haggerty, Kevin and Ericson, Richard. (2000). “The Surveillant Assemblage,” British Journal of Sociology, 51(4): 605–22.

Clarke, R. A. (1988). “Information Technology and Dataveillance” Communications of the ACM, 31: 498-512.

Marx, Gary T. (1988). Undercover: Police Surveillance in America, Berkeley: University of California Press.

Solove, D. (2007): “I’ve Got Nothing to Hide’ and Other Misunderstandings of Privacy”, 44 San Diego Law Review 745.

Andrejevic, M. (2007). “Surveillance in the Digital Enclosure,” Communication Review, 10(4): 295–317.

Schneier, B. (2010). ‘Security and Function Creep’. Security & Privacy, 8 (1).

 

BACK TO MODULES
 
 
MENU